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Art is the opposite of entertainment.

"One of the most profound musical compositions of all time is the Quartet for the End of Time written by French composer Olivier Messiaen in 1940. Messiaen was 31 years old when France entered the war against Nazi Germany. He was captured by the Germans in June of 1940, sent across Germany in a cattle car and imprisoned in a concentration camp.

He was fortunate to find a sympathetic prison guard who gave him paper and a place to compose. There were three other musicians in the camp, a cellist, a violinist, and a clarinetist, and Messiaen wrote his quartet with these specific players in mind. It was performed in January 1941 for four thousand prisoners and guards in the prison camp. Today it is one of the most famous masterworks in the repertoire.

Given what we have since learned about life in the concentration camps, why would anyone in his right mind waste time and energy writing or playing music? There was barely enough energy on a good day to find food and water, to avoid a beating, to stay warm, to escape torture—why would anyone bother with music? And yet—from the camps, we have poetry, we have music, we have visual art; it wasn’t just this one fanatic Messiaen; many, many people created art. Why? Well, in a place where people are only focused on survival, on the bare necessities, the obvious conclusion is that art must be, somehow, essential for life. The camps were without money, without hope, without commerce, without rec reation, without basic respect, but they were not without art. Art is part of survival; art is part of the human spirit, an unquenchable expression of who we are. Art is one of the ways in which we say, “I am alive, and my life has meaning.”" --from Karl Paulnack's welcome speech to freshmen at the Boston Conservatory (you can read the rest here).

Just something to think about I suppose.

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And now, the challenge:
This week, it's an abstract painting expressing some emotion (of your choice). Pay attention to your color choices. Make a conscious decision about the forms you use and how they will portray what you want to get across. You must be clear in your own mind what you are trying to say for there to be any chance someone else will see anything in it. Do not title your work with your emotion (so we can try to figure it out for ourselves).

As always, anyone can jump in. Check out the club info for more details.

Submissions <--- Look at everyone's entries

Club Info <--- Read about the club
Add a Comment:
 
:iconm0nkeybread:
M0nkeyBread Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
Don't think I'll be succesfull according to the brief, but it was fun trying.
[link]
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:iconsticmann:
sticmann Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2009
It's up :)
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:icondwsel:
dwsel Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2009   Digital Artist
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:iconsticmann:
sticmann Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2009
It's up.
Reply
:iconm0nkeybread:
M0nkeyBread Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
holy crap...abstract emotion...I may hit on an emotion but totally by accident most likely...interesting challenge though. I was looking at an abstract test thingy of mine not long ago and considering doing something less literal, so there ya go. Good timing once again.....sigh for my invisible cities....still stuck on number one. Shouldn't complain about having too many ideas I guess!
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:iconsticmann:
sticmann Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2009
Well, not abstract emotion. An abstract painting expressing emotion. Is that what you meant? I think it'll be a good one.
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:iconm0nkeybread:
M0nkeyBread Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
yep sorry, I meant an abstract implying an emotion ;)
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March 15, 2009
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